The Rita is completed!

Kim and Richard’s Tiny House on Rita Street in Sarasota  County, Florida is complete.  We ride-tested this little tiny house for 5 days over the 4th of July weekend with a load of 4 people, and found that it rode pretty smooth.

The Rita

We had more visitors – neighbors, West Coast acquaintances, and Rita fans – in 4 days than we had moving in may to Audubon Park.  This perhaps speaks more about the West Coast lifestyle vs. the Central Florida lifestyle.  Here people are busy, generally keep to themselves, and feel like they are intruding, I guess. In Sarasota, we had multiple visitors that came and enjoyed the Rita’s hospitality.  We had real conversations with real people.

The Rita is set in a plane of white gravel which is near-zero maintenance.  The boys found a shark’s tooth in the gravel.  It is on short concrete piers with a 2′ high crawl space.  Riding up on piers allows the land underneath to breathe and for the Rita’s ventilation to work properly like a true Cracker house.

The foundation is fairly solid.  There were some interesting secondary vibrations through the house when the washing machine was on the spin cycle.  Footsteps did not reverberate.

The front elevation expresses mobility, our age of motion accelerated.  And yet it is very static, anchored to the land. The front wall is a grid that is thirteen wide by seven high, interrupted by a simple white band.  These two prime numbers plus the partial end corners yield a rhythm that is both complete and incomplete at the same time. The lack of certainty in the front facade expression – nothing is an even number, the ends are slightly unresolved – references our current times of incomplete wisdom and a searching, a yearning for closure.

The central white band can be read in multiple ways. It emphasizes the door, a decidedly un-sarasota-school move (entries were de-emphasized by Rudolph and his peers, you just slipped between two floating plans and presto!  you’re inside before you know it). Here the Rita presents the front door to you in a pure, white band.

An element, repeated thrice, has been a theme of our existence together even back in Hawaii days and extending to Norris.  Chelsea and Rita both have the number 3 repeated in patterns, solids, and voids in its design.

The interior space, upon entering, fulfilled its requirement to have a series of interlocking functional areas that unite more than they separate.  This is typical of nearly all tiny houses but it was particularly important with the vertical space to unite the loft. From 3 people to, at one time, eight, we had plenty of space and it did not feel crowded like a hotel room would if 8 people were in it.

The quality of light was diffuse and generally very high, and it changed throughout the day. The Rita is surrounded by the lush tropical rainforest of Florida’s lower west coast.  The greens of the trees highlighted many of the colors inside and as the sun moved across the sky there was a delightful sense of time passing. It was as if the interior of the main space was a little bubble, holding a soft bright light inside.

The wasp-tail between the two wet rooms wasn’t too narrow.  One wet room – holding two lavatories and a toilet – was surprisingly spacious. The other wet room had a shower and a tiny washer/dryer combo and it felt fine.  It was the smallest room in the house but with a window it was not too claustrophobic.

The  bedroom, with its niches, also felt significantly larger than it was, due to the high ceiling.

The loft was perhaps the most successful space of all.  With one window facing north, up high, and another window facing west, down low, the loft was filled with stronger light but it had a “treehouse” sensibility being up in the trees.  The boys seemed to enjoy it and rarely came down except during feeding times.

As a design experiment the Rita is more successful than I ever expected.  Kim Mathis’ interior design talent helped to furnish the interior in a way that enhances the spaces. Scott Stoothoff, the builder, took great care with the construction, interpreting the design skillfully, and the result is an excellent living space with plenty of happy small details that he finished well, so the house will reveal interest and delight over and over again.

[see https://www.facebook.com/theritasarasota/?ref=bookmarks for photos].

 

 

Tiny House Library

The first of a three-part series, “The Tiny Houses of Sarasota,” aired Sunday evening at 5 with the Suncoast News Network.  The Rita has received the attention of this news network for its innovation.  This documentary may be viewed by clicking here.

 

A Building Concept, Inc. has been selected as the General Contractor for The Rita.  “We’re pleased to have the opportunity to build something small, but high-quality,” stated Scott Stoothoff, Owner of ABCI.  “The Rita promises to be an intriguing construction project.”

 

The Rita will be an advancement of the concept of the Solid State House.

The Rita

Plans for Tiny Houses are in demand.  The most recent plan, the Rita, incorporates key learnings from the Walker Guest House in terms of economy of materials and proportions.  The Rita will feature some of the same materials – painted plywood floors and walls, a modular kitchen – and be as open -plan as possible given the limited amount of space.

East End District Arises

East End’s midcentury modern integrity makes it a desirable place to live.
The street markets and rich sidewalk life attracts creatives, thinkers, and doers.
Building with the East End’s bohemian character, these residences capture
the spirit of the postwar period with two models:
–The Jack, an affordable residence gently inserted into the neighborhood
–The Al, a slightly larger home slipped into a narrow lot between homes.
For more on this exciting new development, go to the East End Project Page.

Dreams of Escape

Opening January 1, 2016

Stardust Video and Coffee

1842 E. Winter Park Road

Orlando, FL 32803

Soviet Air

Opening January 1, 2016

Stardust Video and Coffee

1842 E. Winter Park Road

Orlando, FL  32803

Dreams of escape

Chaos can have a healing character

if it is coupled with the idea of open movement

to channel the warmth of chaotic energy into order or form.

-Joseph Beuys

Order and form are the two rails on which architecture rolls.  The newfound vigor of chaos derails architecture into black, deadend tunnels choked with soot, illimitable delays, and colorful desultory wrecks.  At the end of nearly every day, after observing or managing chaos, I depart the scene with nothing to show for it.  Nothing, except for small drawings.

Chaos is here to stay:  meaningless bright adversity, overbearing dull beige banality, and the profligate urgent shrillness of spendthrift capitalism all create absurdity and waste beyond even Kafka’s wildest imagination.   Arising out of this disorder come small bubbles of order, moments when one hand, temporarily unoccupied by the keyboard or the legal pad, can briefly roam free and make a connection between things that are separated.

This installation is a bank, a place where I deposit my dreams of escape.  I participate in the warmth of chaotic energy without emotion; instead I invest emotions into small things, the open movement of my hand creating these dreams of escape. Meanwhile, order and form get restored.

Few, if any, of these are actual planes.  They are dreams of aircraft, sketched during chaos; they are ways out.  Tiny, quickly scratched blossoms of highly ordered objects, droplets of comfort and calm.

Left side Right side
F6F Hellcat model in cement

Bomber engine

fighter nose

British twin engine fighter

early jet air scoop

flying boat

Russian helicopter

Comically fat Russian jet

Slightly comical American fighter

Russian fighter flying overhead

Bomber

BAC Caravelle ghost

F-16 ghost

F-117 ghost

Fighter, probably Russian

Sub patrol aircraft

Supersonic airliner

Navy fighter caught with propeller

Bomber on crumpled paper

Dive bomber far away

Russian transporter tail

Eastern European jet trainer

Russian jet of some kind

Early jet fighter coming at  you

The one and only B-58

Two-engine passenger plane

Bit of a carrier-based navy plane

Bomber

Bomber engine

Early Swedish jet trainer studies

Another eastern European jet trainer

Kind of a British fighter-bomber

Yet another eastern European jet trainer

Russian turboprop bomber with Russian jet transporter flying in formation

A MiG

An air intake

Another MiG

P-38s over a house

Possibly a Tupolev under the drawing

Richard Reep
Winter Park, Florida

2016

MiG-3
MiG-15

Contemporary Tabby

Cement works update

Ancient tabby marks Florida’s sense of place.  Tabby is the colloquial name for an early Spanish colonial form of cement.  A cake of sand, lime, shells, and water created an architecture of walls and forts.  Some of this is still extant today.

Tabby wall, St. Augustine, 16th c (left closeup)

This series of contemporary tabby adds manmade materials in the same mixture.  Lime, or calcium hydroxide, is the main ingredient of Type I Portland Cement.

Contemporary Tabby 1

Shells served as aggregate in Spanish tabby.  The aggregate helps bind the cement together, increase volume.  Aggregate also helps break up clods of lime when mixing.  The Titan that I mixed for this series was pure Type I with no aggregate, and it was very laborious to mix it to a smooth, even consistency.

I harvested the shells and the manmade material from Siesta Key Beach in July 2015, off the coast of Sarasota.  The manmade portions in this first piece occur in approximately the same density as found on the beach.  This indicates that the proportion of natural-to-manmade material on the beach is pretty high.

Air